In Order To Be Recognized, I Have to Actively Come Out

“I recognize the particular challenges of holding an identity not visually apparent. In order to be recognized, I have to actively come out. I can be fairly certain that if I don’t, I will be misread. Bi folks share the challenge of holding a nonbinary identity in a culture that leans heavily on binary assumptions.”

Robyn Ochs, “Bodies & Barriers: Queer Activists on Health”

Why I call myself Bisexual

“I call myself bisexual because I acknowledge that I have in myself the potential to be attracted – romantically and/or sexually – to people of more than one gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way, and not necessarily to the same degree.”

Robyn Ochs

Bi and pan folks: let’s work together

“I sincerely hope that we refrain from responding to our own hurt and erasure by inflicting pain on other marginalized people,” says Ochs. “Rather, let us understand the dynamics and systems of oppression that cause this pain, work to challenge and dismantle these systems, and heal ourselves and support others who have been harmed. Bi and pan folks: let’s work together to hold open the space between and beyond the binary.”

Robyn Ochs, Bustle

As You Work To Make Change, Don’t Forget To Take Good Care Of Yourself

“As you work to make change, don’t forget to take good care of yourself.

Pace yourself.

Take breaks when you need them.

Eat and sleep and dance and connect with loved ones, and take time to breathe deeply and smell the flowers.

Remember to appreciate one another, and know that I value and appreciate you.”

Robyn Ochs

Will You Show Up?

“What is important is not only how you identify, but also what you stand for. Will you show up? Will you advocate for the people around you who experience challenges and struggles that you may not be experiencing yourself? That’s what counts.”

-Robyn Ochs

Activists Are Cultural Artists

“Activists are cultural artists. They envision a world that does not yet exist and then take action to bring that world into being”

Robyn Ochs

“For about three decades, I was saying these things and doing this work, and I felt no one was listening, that nothing was changing. I don’t feel that way anymore. Things are changing. I feel we are moving forward, [and] I feel that there’s more oxygen in the air for people with nonbinary sexualities, and this brings me joy. This makes me feel that the work we’ve been doing all these years has actually made some sort of a difference.”

Robyn Ochs, bi.org

“It wasn’t until I finally began coming out to others that I realized how much I had been suffocating in my own silence.” 

Robyn Ochs, LGBTQ Policy Journal